Le Sabre

The Forgotten 13-Letter Word: Cyberbullying

Shayna Rabin, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 14.9% of high school students were cyberbullied in 2016. This is because as technology continues to advance, new ways for people to manipulate it and bully others increase.  With this in mind, it is important to confront cyberbullying head on to ensure that it does not continue on and impact future generations.

In our current day, everyone often heavily relies on technology for their daily needs. However, when one begins to separate how they would act in person from social media it can often lead to the mistreatment of those online and lack of accountability. Cyberbullying is a term that everyone has heard of, but must choose to ignore.

Taking a firm stance on cyberbullying since becoming the First Lady back in 2017, Melania Trump first launched her Be Best Campaign this last May. The goal in her campaign is to “Teach kids how to identify bullying and how to stand up to it safely.” Since acquiring this position, she has been gradually taking steps to resolve this issue that many young people deal with.

On Monday, Aug. 20 she spoke at the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention Summit on Cyberbullying, where she and many others addressed the issues of internet safety and using the Internet for one’s benefit. The First Lady tells parents, “But we still need to do all we can to provide them [children] with information and tools for successful and safe online habits,” according to ABC News.

Moreover, it is important that children do not just rely on adults for information on internet safety but that they rely also on their peers. Our peers have also grown up with the Internet at their fingertips meaning that they experience the technological advancements of society as well. Being a part of an increasingly developed world makes it clear that to prosper, people have to rely on one another to avoid a downfall.

Realizing “in great detail” that cyberbullying has become a more pressing issue these past 3-5 years closer to home, Ms. Jennifer Macon, the coordinator of Cleveland’s Humanities Magnet (CORE), decided to take action and organized an assembly for CORE students to gain more information on Internet safety. Her focus was particularly on the 9th Graders because, as the new generation, she wants them to interact in “a campus with no bullying.”

She believes that teachers, staff and students should all know what bullying is and the differences between an argument and bullying. With this information, cyberbullying will be easier to identify and will allow for the youth to be responsible digital citizens.

 

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Student News Site of Cleveland Charter High School
The Forgotten 13-Letter Word: Cyberbullying